Working with Isabel Mundry and Raphael Cendo

Teaching alongside my Ecce colleagues, Isabel Mundry and Raphael Cendo last week at the Goethe Institute. Eight fellows from around the world joined us for readings of their work, lessons and masterclasses. Read more here. Thanks so much to the Goethe Institute, Harvard, New England Conservatory and the French Consulate for their support!

Etchings 2014

Thanks to everyone who made Etchings 2014 so special. Working with you all was an unbelievable pleasure and I feel lucky to have had another great summer. Special thanks to Mark Andre and Garth Knox for being extraordinary people and amazing musicians.

Etchings 2014
Etchings 2014

Etchings 2014

Looking forward to working with Beat Furrer, GarthKnox, and a group of great young composers at Etchings this summer. And so excited to be with some truly remarkable performers. Before we set out, you can catch the premiere of Ephemera at the Ivry-sur-Seine in Paris on June 28th, 8:30PM. If you’re in Paris next week, please come by!

etchings-2014-version-3-625x625

The Riot Ensemble Performs Aura

indexLast week, the ensemble Riot gave two amazing performances of my ensemble work, Aura. This is a top class ensemble. Not only excellent players, but a great dynamic and very professional work ethic. The rehearsals were a joy and the piece sounded great from the get go. It was a pleasure to work on refined details and interpretation. And the performances were just full of life and nuance. I can’t recommend the group enough. Some pictures below of my time with the group, and I’ll post a recording as soon as possible.

Premiere at Harvard

Thanks to all who made possible such a beautiful event at Harvard last Tuesday! Below, you can hear the piece and read the text and program note. For all interested, I highly recommend the poetry of Dean Young. His work is full of music!

I Saw My Life Go By in the Coyote’s Jaws

Sharon Harms, soprano; Camila Barrientos, clarinet; Hassan Anderson, oboe;
Yohanan Chendler, violin; Serafim Smigelskiy, cello

Jeffrey Means, conductor

Note:

Much of Dean Young’s poetry finds moments of inspiration in the mundane. The voices in Young’s poems struggle with daily life and are often caught off guard by the epiphanies it can reveal. Young’s character’s marvel at the idiosyncratic passage of time, similar to the way music has the ability to change our temporal perception. Young’s play with words and striking contrasts also lend his work to musical interpretations. My setting attempts to capture the elusive bubbling of creativity that wells up from the unconscious of Young’s many voices.